Apple iPad Pro 12.9 (2021) runs laps around the competition in Geekbench

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Apple’s new M1-powered iPad Pro 11 (2021) and 12.9 (2021) will be out in a few weeks, but the first Geekbench results are already out – and they are quite impressive. The benchmark was run on an iPad 12.9 Pro (2021) with 16 GB of RAM.

The single-core performance is comparable to the Apple A14 chipset in the iPhone 12 series, they use the same cores after all. However, the M1 has four major compared to the two in phones, making a massive difference in multi-core testing.

When you look at the best chipsets available for Android, it appears that Apple has a massive lead. We’ve also included some x86-powered laptops like the Surface 4 with an Intel Core i7-1185G7 or an HP ProBook x360 G8 with an AMD Ryzen 7 5800U for comparison (both are in the 15W class but have higher TDP modes).


GeekBench 5 (single-core)

Higher is better

  • iPad Pro 12.9 (2021) (Apple M1)
    1727
  • iPhone 12 Pro Max (Apple A14)
    1606
  • Microsoft Surface 4 (i7-1185G7)
    1513
  • HP ProBook x360 G8 (Ryzen 5800U)
    1431
  • ROG Phone 5 (S888, X Mode + FAN)
    1127
  • OnePlus 9 Pro (Snapdragon 888)
    1126
  • Galaxy S21 Ultra (Snapdragon 888)
    1109
  • Galaxy S21 Ultra (Exynos 2100)
    1107
  • Huawei Mate X2 (Kirin 9000 5G)
    956

GeekBench 5 (multi-core)

Higher is better

  • HP ProBook x360 G8 (Ryzen 5800U)
    7376
  • iPad Pro 12.9 (2021) (Apple M1)
    7270
  • Microsoft Surface 4 (i7-1185G7)
    5747
  • iPhone 12 Pro Max (Apple A14)
    4240
  • ROG Phone 5 (S888, X Mode + FAN)
    3745
  • OnePlus 9 Pro (Snapdragon 888)
    3636
  • Galaxy S21 Ultra (Exynos 2100)
    3518
  • Huawei Mate X2 (Kirin 9000 5G)
    3389
  • Galaxy S21 Ultra (Snapdragon 888)
    3244

Note: Hover your mouse over the device name (or tap it if you are on mobile) to see more details about the chipset.

It’s pretty impressive what Apple has achieved. And it has reportedly started mass production of a new, more powerful chipset – the Apple M1X or M2. It will be built on a refined version of TSMC’s 5 nm node, which will lead to iterative improvements, but more importantly, the new chip will have a higher core number. The exact number is not yet certain, but Apple may soon have something that competes with Intel and AMD’s desktop-class CPUs.

Source 1 | 2 | 3 | Via

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